1. GA-English
  2. News

Survey: Germans think compulsory home office makes more sense than curfews

Survey : Germans think compulsory home office makes more sense than curfews

Nighttime curfews should help break the third Corona wave in Germany. That's according to the new Infection Protection Act. There is no mention of a home office obligation in it - even though the majority of Germans think it makes much more sense, as our survey shows.

The amendment to the Infection Protection Act, which was approved by the German Cabinet on Tuesday, is intended to ensure that uniform rules apply throughout Germany in the future to contain the Corona pandemic. Among other things, the so-called "emergency brake" provides for nighttime curfews. However, there are no plans to make home offices mandatory, which would curb the rising number of infections in the working environment.

Germans think home office duty makes more sense than curfews

A majority of Germans, however, consider a statutory home office obligation to be much more sensible than nightly curfews for containing the pandemic. This is the result of a representative survey conducted by the opinion research institute Civey on behalf of our editorial team.

Thus, 37.3 percent of respondents are in favor of a home office obligation to break the third Corona wave. Only 11.7 percent consider curfews to be more sensible. 28.3 percent oppose both measures, and 21.9 percent of respondents think mandatory home offices and curfews make equal sense. The rest are undecided.

The younger the respondents, the greater the support for a statutory home office obligation. In the 18-29 age group, around half of respondents support this measure, with only a small minority considering curfews to be more sensible.

In terms of respondents' voting intentions, the greatest support for a statutory home office requirement is found among supporters of the Green Party and the Left Party. The greatest support for nighttime curfews is found among voters of the CDU/CSU parties - but even among them, more respondents are in favor of a mandatory rule that employees should work from home.

Statutory home office obligation divides Germans – greatest approval among under 40s

Overall, the question of a statutory home office obligation divides Germans, as another representative Civey survey commissioned by our editorial team shows. While 45.4 percent of respondents are in favor of introducing one, 42.7 percent reject the proposal. The rest are undecided.

Here, too, there is a clear age divide: Among those under 40, support for a legal provision is particularly high - more than half of respondents are in favor. More than four out of ten respondents even say an obligatory rule should "definitely" be introduced. By contrast, the majority of the over-65s are against a statutory regulation.

In terms of voting intentions, the greatest support for this question is also found among supporters of the Greens, the Left and the SPD. A clear majority of AfD and FDP voters are against introducing a statutory home office obligation to curb the pandemic.

Nationwide, a clear east-west divide emerges on the question of whether employees who can basically work from home should be legally obliged to do so. While the majority of people in the old federal states - with the exception of Baden-Württemberg - are in favor of a home office obligation, the majority of people in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Brandenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia are against a statutory regulation.

For its representative surveys, the opinion research institute Civey only counts the votes of registered and verified Internet users who have provided data such as age, place of residence and gender. The votes are weighted according to a scientific procedure in line with the composition of the German population. For the questions, the responses of 5002 participants were taken into account in each case in the period from 12/04/21 to 13/04/21. The statistical error is 2.5 percent in each case.

(Original text: Sandra Liermann, Translation: Mareike Graepel)