Red rain on the way Plenty of Saharan dust on its way to Bonn

Bonn · Saharan dust is reaching Central Europe. According to meteorologist Karsten Brandt, the dust will fall with the rain over Germany on Thursday and Friday. The weather in Bonn and the surrounding region will also be affected.

 Large amounts of Saharan dust are expected to drift over Germany and large parts of Europe over the next few days (symbolic image).

Large amounts of Saharan dust are expected to drift over Germany and large parts of Europe over the next few days (symbolic image).

Foto: dpa/Philipp von Ditfurth

Large quantities of Saharan dust are currently on their way to Central Europe. This is according to weather expert Karsten Brandt from the weather service donnerwetter.de. On Thursday and Friday, this will be dumped over Germany with the rain. The weather situation in Bonn and the region will also change.

Large amounts of Saharan dust expected

In the next few days, maximum temperatures of 25 to 26 degrees are expected in Bonn and the region. The warm and humid air will also bring Saharan dust with it. This will then be unloaded by rain showers on Thursday and Friday afternoon, according to Brandt. According to him, this time it was a "real load" of Saharan dust. This manifests itself in several grams of dust per square metre that fall to the earth's surface through the rain.

Will the dust also be visible in Bonn?

Saharan dust colours the falling rain and water red. This is why it is also known as "blood rain". After small showers, the red-orange particles will definitely be visible in Bonn and the surrounding area, says Karsten Brandt. "However, it is difficult to determine the exact composition of the blood rain."

Will the dust cause disruption?

According to Brandt, visibility could be impaired in the coming days. Beyond that, however, the mineral dust in combination with the rain is harmless to humans, animals and plants. It is alkaline and has a slight fertilising effect on the soil on which it lands.

How does Saharan dust get to Bonn?

Brandt explains that "certain winds in the Sahara desert in Africa stir up the dust." These are then transported to the Mediterranean by low-pressure systems. Certain weather constellations are then responsible for transporting the dust beyond the Alps. A south-westerly wind then blows the small particles towards Germany and Bonn.

Original text: Celina Baumann

Translation: Mareike Graepel